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change management, LPS

What is Change Management?


People quite often ask what is change management? Change management is how you approach dealing with transition or transformation of organisations. This can involve their technologies, processes or goals. Strategies are used to help people adapt to the change and to also control the change. Procedures are included in the strategic plan to align with the change requests. Mechanisms are also used to follow up on the changes and respond to the requests.


Change management is what guides how companies prepare, equip and support people to successfully adopt the change in order to drive business success. Providing employees with structured approaches for supporting individuals through changes is very important. All changes will be different for each organisation due to the people and the organisation itself. There are three important parts of any change in a company explained further below. 



Organisational Change Management


A project team will be used to manage changes on a one on one basis. Change Management provides companies with step by step actions to take projects to the level needed to support the individuals impacted by those projects and changes. The change will happen on an individual level but on team project managing change one on one doesn’t work. 

Organisational change involves sectioning off the projects and people attached to each project and what those changes will be. Then create a plan that is customised for each project and group of people involved. This will include what training needs to be made and what those people need to be aware of prior and also after the change has been made.

Organisational change comes hand and hand with project management. Project management ensures your project’s solution is designed, developed and delivered, while change management ensures your project’s solution is effectively embraced, adopted and used.


Enterprise Change Management Capability

Enterprise change management is an organizational core competency that provides competitive differentiation and the ability to effectively adapt to the ever-changing world. An enterprise change management capability means effective change management is embedded into your organization. This is through roles, structures, processes, projects and leadership competencies. Change management processes are applied to initiatives. Leaders have the skills to guide their teams through the changes and this leads employees to know what to ask for in order to be successful.

In conclusion enterprise change management capability allows individuals to embrace change more quickly and effectively. A company can respond quickly to market changes, embrace strategic initiatives, and adopt new technology. As a result of responding quickly to market, there is less productivity impact. The following needs a strategic approach to embed change management across an organization.

 

Individual Change Management

Individual change is the understanding of an individuals experience throughout the change. It is understanding what this person needs in order for the change to go well. It involves knowing what messages to tell people and at what times. You also need to factor in that you need to coach people and help them develop the new skills that are involved in the change.  Individual change management is based on psychology and neuroscience. It applies actionable frameworks to individual change. In conclusion to answer what is change management really depends on the organisation and it’s stricture to determine what changes need to be managed and in what ways.

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change management, LPS

Leading Change
By Deanna Sorrell – Change Manager RBNZ

 

Change… we’ve all encountered a change in some shape or form (good or bad!), especially at work as we’re encouraged to be ‘agile’, ‘lean’, efficient and effective. In many organisations change is the new norm and so is actively encouraged and embraced. Ensuring change is adopted and sustained is the challenge, and there are eight steps you can follow to help with the success of your change journey.


*Kotter’s 8-step process for leading change:

Creating a climate for change 

1. Increase Urgency 

2. Build the guiding team 

3. Get the right Vision 

Engaging and enabling the whole organisation 

4. Communicate for buy-in 

5. Empowering action 

6. Create short-term wins 

Implementing and sustaining the change 

7. Don’t let up 

8. Make it stick 

Let’s explore each step in more detail, outlining what you should do as well as what you should try to avoid… 

Creating a climate for change 


1. Increase Urgency 

DO 

* Examine market and competitive realities for potential crises and/or untapped opportunities. 

* Convince at least 75% of your managers that the status quo is more dangerous than the unknown. 

AVOID 

* Underestimating the difficulty of driving people from their comfort zones. 

* Becoming paralysed by risks. 


2. Build the guiding team 

DO 

* Assemble a group of change agents with shared commitment and enough power to lead the change effort. 

* Encourage the group to work as a team outside the normal hierarchy.

AVOID 

* People with no prior experience of teamwork at the top. 

* Relegating team leadership to HR, or elsewhere rather than a senior line manager. 


3. Get the right Vision 

DO 

* Create a vision to direct the change effort. 

* Develop strategies for realising this vision. 

AVOID 

* Presenting a vision that’s too complicated or vague. 

Engaging and enabling the whole organisation 


4. Communicate for buy-in 

DO 

* Use every vehicle possible to communicate the new vision and strategies for achieving it. 

* Teach new behaviours by the examples given by the guiding coalition. 

AVOID 

* Under communicating the vision. 

* Behaving in ways that oppose the vision. 


5. Empowering action 

DO 

* Remove or change systems or structures undermining the vision. 

* Encourage risk-taking and non-traditional ideas, activities, and actions. 

AVOID 

* Failing to remove powerful individuals who resist the change effort. 


6. Create short-term wins 

DO 

* Define and engineer visible performance improvements. 

* Recognise and rewards employees contributing to those improvements. 

AVOID 

* Leaving short-term successes to chance. 

* Failing to score successes soon enough. 

Implementing and sustaining the change 


7. Don’t let up 

DO 

* Use increased credibility from early wins to change systems, structures and policies undermining the vision. 

* Hire, promote and develop employees who can implement the vision. 

* Reinvigorate the change process with new projects and change agents. 

AVOID 

* Declaring victory too soon – with the first performance improvements. 

* Allowing resistors to convince the ‘troops’ that the war has been won. 


8. Make it stick 

DO 

* Articulate connections between new behaviours and corporate success. 

* Create leadership development and succession plans consistent with the new approach. 

AVOID 

* Not creating new social norms and shared values consistent with change. 

* Promoting people into leadership positions who don’t personify the new approach. 

*John P.Kotter is internationally known and widely regarded as the foremost speaker on the topics of Leading Change. He is the premier voice on how the best organisations actually achieve successful transformations, having identified and extracted the success factors into a methodology, the 8-Step Process for Leading Change.

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change management, LPS, PM Systems

Change Management in an Agile Environment
By Helen Franklin Change Manager – Vodafone

If you’re new to the idea of change management, or you’ve never really understood what it is, it’s most simply defined as “managing the people side of change”. It’s a simple definition of something that can be pretty complex and messy in real life. In a given day our change managers can work on everything from gaining the buy-in of senior leaders to a controversial solution, to finding creative ways to make difficult changes exciting and engaging for the people in our companies.

We have a number of change managers working with our LPS customers today, in industries as diverse as telco, financial services, and logistics. We also work today on both waterfall and Agile programmes, as well as programmes with one foot in each camp!

In March I was lucky enough to spend a few days in Las Vegas. I was able to attend the global Association of Change Management Professionals (ACMP) conference. The big topic of discussion was how we adapt our change management practices to align with Agile ways of working.


When we talk about change management and Agile, we’re usually talking about one of two things:



1. Transforming to Agile: Helping people to transition to Agile ways of working
2. Delivering within Agile: Helping manage the people side of initiatives that are being delivered by Agile teams


Insights from ACMP about effectively delivering within Agile.



Understand that the principles of change management are just as important in an Agile environment, but accept that there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach or framework that will apply exactly to what you are doing. Instead of focusing on tools, methods, or checklists go back to the basics of what outcomes you are trying to achieve and what you think will help deliver those outcomes.

Treat your change management activity as “plays” in a playbook, or experiments, instead of a set in stone plan. Create a backlog of change activity that you think will help achieve your outcomes, but be willing to adapt or throw ideas away if they aren’t working. Align your planning and experimentation to the sprint cycles of your Agile teams.

Set and manage expectations early. Both your sponsors and your “users” need to understand not only what’s changing because of your initiative(s), but what’s different about how the initiative is being delivered (if Agile is new or new-ish to them). Taking the extra time to explain the approach early will be worth it.

Consider how you can do training and communications in small bite-sized pieces. Explore Digital Adoption Platforms, Micro-Learning, and Point of Need Learning, which all aim to provide the right amount of information to the right person at the right time.

So there are some interesting ideas for your next Agile change – what have you tried that worked or didn’t?

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LPS, PM Systems

The new LPS tagline launched at the Hurricanes opening game for the Super Rugby season.

The new LPS tagline was launched during the opening home game of the Hurricanes for the Super Rugby season. The tagline aligns with the direction of where LPS is heading as a company. The last tagline was “We do Projects” and as LPS grew the company also outgrew the tagline. “Transform : Deliver”. The new tagline aligns with where the company positions itself as a market leader in its industry.


Transform : Deliver



LPS chose “Deliver” as a keyword for the new tagline because as a company we help our clients deliver high-level projects. We also deliver top quality service aligning with our client’s culture as well as our own. By delivering great projects we are able to transform our client’s companies. With the age of digital, this is a key part of our business model making sure we’re able to make positive change for our clients. LPS wouldn’t be the company it is today without living and breathing the company slogan. LPS delivers large transformation programmes for private and public enterprise organisations throughout New Zealand and Australia


Hurricanes LPS

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Governance, LPS, PM Systems

PM Systems LTD (LPS) appointed to AOG Business Change panel.




As part of the All-of-Government (AOG) Consultancy Services solution, New Zealand Government Procurement (NZGP) has established the Business and Finance category.  This category offers eligible government agencies specialist advice. It also offers competitive solutions from a broad panel of experienced consultancies. PM Systems Ltd, trading as LPS, is pleased to have been appointed as a panel provider in the Business Change tier 3 (AOG Business Change). Eligible government agencies are encouraged to contact the Consultancy Centre of Expertise to sign up to the contract. This means there are benefits from the discounted rates, standardised terms, and conditions offered through the AoG Consultancy Services solution. Further information can be found on the Consultancy Services page on the New Zealand Government Procurement website.





The AOG Business Change panel opens great opportunities for LPS. It allows LPS to establish a wider team and to swiftly contract with government. Working with companies like PM Systems LTD (LPS) saves government agencies time and money. In conclusion, this saves taxpayers money which means that money can be spent elsewhere. The AOG panel allows access to a range of providers offering quality and good value for money services.  For more information on the panel and to find out more about All-of-Government (AOG) visit the Procurement website:  https://www.procurement.govt.nz/contracts/consultancy-services/

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LPS, PM Systems

DX Conference Insights on Digital and Data


By Rob Franklin
Digital Delivery and Performance Manager – Vodafone
 
I was fortunate enough to attend DX 2018 ( DX conference ) a conference which focused on Digital Transformation. The key theme of Digital Transformation was covered by a number of leading industry speakers. They spoke on topics from Strategy and Governance to Technology and Platforms through to Customer Experience and Operational Efficiency.

The speakers each gave their point of view on competing in a world driving towards more digitally connected customers. Alex and Google home ecosystems have given people access to information at their fingertips. This is because of the use of voice command which is ever evolving in these two examples. A key theme that resonated with me through all of the presentations was “Think Relationships, not Transactions”. There was a lot of discussion about benefits of Agile, AI, IoT and scalable platforms. At the end of the day, all of these things support your organisation to understand your customers better. This allows you to act on their needs, improve and tailor their experience, or identify and capitalise on new needs, faster. All of this really leads to building a relationship with a customer eloquently put as.

“I want to be your favourite hello and your hardest goodbye”.

Thinking about relationships, not transactions is really about becoming Customer obsessed. Gunjan Bhow the keynote speaker, CDO at Walt Disney, really focused on this and it was constantly referred back to throughout presenters discussions. A great lesson for organisations was covered by Gunjan from his experience with Amazon. Organisations need to focus on addressing customer or organisational needs. This is before they look at how technology can help address these needs. They need to ask what can we do with a new technology after it is here.

DX conference “Technology is an enabler, not the change itself.”

To enable an organisation to really become customer-obsessed we need data about our customers. The more data we can collect the more we can assess and therefore can let the data lead us. A key theme touched on by a number of presenters was how we use digital not only to broker a sale but to really know a customer. We can use data to anticipate their needs. This allows people to personalise their interactions and surprise and delight them with things they would never expect. The focus on data provided a clear action for organisations, a key pillar of your digital strategy has to be a cohesive data collection and usage strategy. Collecting data, shaping it, using it to lead us and ultimately monetising it is key.

In conclusion:

Whilst the overall message at the DX conference was clearly organisations need Digital transformation to survive. But the real challenge set out here is how we as an organisation become customer-obsessed. How we move from transactions to relationships and collect and use data appropriately to ultimately surprise and delight our customers.

DX conference
LPS sponsor of the coffee cart for the DX conference for 2018.
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LPS, PM Systems

LPS attends and sponsors the CFO Summit

The CFO Summit was held at the newly renovated Cordis Hotel in Auckland this year. The conference saw over 140 delegates attend the conference during the day and over 300 people attended the gala dinner. LPS sponsored a stand in the main hall as well as sponsoring the networking drinks. Kevin Maloney was able to launch our new Agile video featuring Erika Barden Transformation Specialist on the main stage during the CFO Summit. LPS attended the CFO Summit gala dinner to support KiwiRail and Air New Zealand. Both companies were up for awards at the dinner. All though KiwiRail didn’t take away any of the awards it was good to have a few LPS team there to support the company and the members from KiwiRail that attended the awards dinner.

CFO Summit LPS

Overall the summit was a great conference allowing LPS to interact with existing clients. We were able to also network with potential clients to broaden the LPS brand. This was a great conference and one will look to support in the future.

LPS CFO Summit
Launch of the new LPS video on the main stage screen at the CFO Summit.

LPS staff member Kevin Maloney on stage at the CFO Summit conference
Kevin Maloney speaking on the main stage at the conference and introducing our brand new agile video.



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Governance, LPS, PM Systems

PM Systems LTD (LPS) appointed to AOG Assurance panel.




As part of the All-of-Government (AOG) Consultancy Services solution, New Zealand Government Procurement (NZGP) has established the Business and Finance category.  This category offers eligible government agencies specialist advice. It also offers competitive solutions from a broad panel of experienced consultancies. PM Systems Ltd, trading as LPS, is pleased to have been appointed as a panel provider in the Assurance tier 3 (AOG Assurance). Eligible government agencies are encouraged to contact the Consultancy Centre of Expertise to sign up to the contract. This means there are benefits from the discounted rates, standardised terms and conditions offered through the AoG Consultancy Services solution. Further information can be found on the Consultancy Services page on the New Zealand Government Procurement website.





The AOG Assurance panel opens great opportunities for LPS. It allows LPS to establish a wider team and to swiftly contract with government. Working with companies like PM Systems LTD (LPS) saves government agencies time and money. In conclusion, this saves taxpayers money which means that money can be spent elsewhere. The AOG panel allows access to a range of providers offering quality and good value for money services.  For more information on the panel and to find out more about All-of-Government (AOG) visit the Procurement website:  https://www.procurement.govt.nz/contracts/consultancy-services/

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LPS

LPS Sponsors the Hurricanes Super Rugby team, 2018.

LPS is excited to announce that once again in 2018, we are sponsoring the Hurricanes Super Rugby team, with on-field signage during the Wellington home games. 


The Hurricanes are one of New Zealand’s most successful rugby teams. In addition they boast a number of high profile All Blacks and upcoming players. As a result the Hurricanes have had top 4 finishes for 3 years, and a championship win in 2016. This solidifies their status as a force to be reckoned with, and a team we are proudly associated with. 


Sponsoring the team gives us unmatched prime-time brand exposure during game time in one of our key markets Wellington. It also gives us exposure across Australasia including replays, news footage, social and print media. Hosting rights allows LPS to entertain key decision makers and clients in a unique environment. Consequently building our profile, networks and ultimately opening more doors to iconic and interesting project work among current and new customers.  Access to players and coaches also gives us the ability to run inspirational events. In 2017 the Hurricanes head Coach Chris Boyd spoke at our event about Change, Culture and building a high performing team to our hosted client BNZ. 


We are especially excited to be involved again this year. The first game saw LPS launch our new company tagline. The Hurricanes games are a great way for us to reach out to existing connections and also create new relationships. LPS has the same views on company culture as the Hurricanes therefore sponsoring the Hurricanes Super Rugby team is a relevant fit. We’re hoping that the Hurricanes can secure another win this year with the whole company supporting the team. Look out on our social media for updates on how the Hurricanes are tracking for the season.

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LPS

Doing Agile right

By Kamaal Ahmed

We have all heard it in some form or the other – Agile is the next great movement. It will transform the way we work and improve how we achieve success.  If you have been involved in or near technology or ICT, I’m certain that you have at least encountered, if not directly been inducted with, Agile Development adoption movement. It’s a phenomenon and one that is not undeserving of its merits. I personally have seen the positive-to-incredible impacts it has on a number of different organisations from different parts of the globe.  But how success manifests itself in those companies varies for a variety of different reasons. 



Here are few things that I have seen that what has enabled success with different entities:

  • Set Principles over Process – Those that are adopting Agile really should be learning, understanding and applying the values and principles listed out in the Agile Manifesto.  Don’t get caught up in mandating process and tools. Those are just enablers put forth to reinforce the core of what Agile is intended to establish.  You can hide behind process, but the philosophy is what provides a firm foundation and the value that will truly deliver.
  • Give Space & Time – Leaders within the org should allow the necessary space and time for teams to properly adopt Agile.  It is important for teams to be given what is required to learn and best understand how to best implement Agile.  Leaders that are impatient and expect things to pick up quickly will be disappointed. 
  • Journey, not Destination – One of the major principles of Agile is to allow the team to continually improve and evolve with the needs of the business and their customers.  The transformation shouldn’t be looked as ‘set it once and done’.  When first adopting Agile, teams should find what is the bare minimum (start small) of what they need to get started, apply those quickly, put it to use, and continue to grow & learn and never stop.
  • Manage Your Space – With any major change introduced, it’s easy to fall prey to overstepping your area. Trying to ensure that the entire end-to-end process is being followed properly.  If each person only stays within their jurisdiction, then the entire system will function best.  Product Owners should manage the product, not projects.  Scrum Masters should manage the scrum and sprints, not the team.  The team should manage itself, and nothing else.  People Managers should manage individuals, not the team. 
  • Fully Self-sufficient Team – The team needs everything within it to fully empower it to be successful and at the end of the day, deliver real value.  This means the team should be cross-functional – including individuals from the different subject-matters to help achieve success.  The teams contain developers, testers, analysts, and users. In addition anybody can be in the teams long as they are helping to turn an idea into tangible, realised output.  The less external dependency the team has, the nimbler it can be and the more traction it can make.
  • Wider Departments Change – Agile is a transformation targeted at software development. I have seen first-hand that if other departments evolve to better enable Agile, then the whole organization benefits.  It can be a wide systematic change if the leaders allow it to be.  This can go as far as how the organisations manage projects, control their financing (operating expense), treat their employees, customer engagement and business strategy. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list nor even a checklist. These are just high-level observations that I have seen from teams that have realised Agile achieve success early on.

 

Conclusion:
















I believe LPS has poised itself to be in a great position. To be a proven instructor and enabler to help clients in realising the full potential of what Agile may offer.  We have some amazing, talented and smart folks amongst the staff that can architect and execute an Agile transformation that will offer the best benefit and impact to a client.  I am excited about the future of how digital organisations will continue to evolve & improve and how LPS will be at the forefront of that transformation.


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